Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Loofah

So, I was at the grocery store last night and spotted a buch of huge loofah's hanging from a rack. We had been thinking of replacing most of the plastic in the kitchen (and in our daily eating habits--you know, like switching from plastic containers to ceramic and glass) so I nabbed one as they were pretty cheap ($2). I get home, cut baseball sized piece off and start waching dishes with this thing. In case you didn't know, the loofah is a plant. I did not have high hopes that a plant was going to be very useful in washing my dishes especially since I use these high-tech scrubber sponges (blue ones for glasses and yellow ones for everything else) but it really really worked! Who would have guessed? Now if I can find some way to know which one to use for glasses and which one to use for other stuff I am good to go!




NOTE: The glass thing: Ximena has a very strong sense of smell so we have to have a sponge just for glasses otherwise she says things like "Why does my coffee smell like fish again?"

8 comments:

  1. i did not know loofah is a plant.

    do people use loofah for taking shower?.. now that you have mention you use it for washing dishes, back in india n nepal some people use loofah to srub their body. i was one of them. i don't know if it is a good idea but that thing burns the skin since its so roughhh. whenever i see that thing, it scares me. lol.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes--you can use it in the shower. There are differenct types and some are softer. If you buy one that is flat in the package (it puffs with water), it is the kind that gets soft when wet. I like it!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dr. Smith this part needs revision specially the tense, "I get home, cut baseball sized piece off and start waching dishes with this thing. In case you didn't know, the loofah is a plant." However, I knew this thing since my childhood. We had a lot of them. No one planted them. They grew without nurturing. The plant was like a grape plant, but the part we used to clean our dishes looked like cucumber or zucchini or something like that. When the fruit was riping, the inside became like a net. Our villagers used them to wash their own bodies. Women used them to clean the dishes ( women usually did cleaning and they used pure clay instead of detergent). You are not surprised to hear that, are you?

    ReplyDelete
  4. It has extremely bitter taste.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Mary-- Yes, I was in a hurry and this one has typos. But, I think I will leave them for now. I use the loofah in the shower as well (a different one of course).

    I do not think I will try eating my loofah! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  6. In fact, there are two kinds of Loofah. One is vegetable another is not just because of it's bitter taste. When we had a lot grown we did not not which one is the one we can use as vegetable. So, we needed to taste them by breaking a little piece and putting it on tongue. (That's how I know the taste). Loofah is vegetable when it is tender and green. When it grows, it develops the net inside and loses vegetable quality [and may be gains the quality to be available in the kitchen or bath tub:]

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is very common to use a loofah in Brazil. I could never get used to using a it in the shower, is really rough! Guess I got the bad one hahahaha. I had no idea you could use it to wash dishes...maybe I'll try it at home! my mom would probably kick me out of the house though =]

    ReplyDelete
  8. The loofah works well for dishes. Grease and whatever washes out of it really easily.

    ReplyDelete